March 27, 2017

Youngest player in Limacol CPL out to prove his worth

Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago – Most 17-year-olds in Trinidad and Tobago are either preparing for, or hoping to soon celebrate the completion of A level exams; others are considering which university to attend, while some youngsters’ concept of forward planning consists of organising whatever fete is scheduled for Friday night.
Seventeen-year-old Nicholas Pooran however, doesn’t have time to think about any of these things as he is too busy working on achieving some major career breakthroughs. One of these is representing his country’s team at the inaugural Limacol Caribbean Premier League alongside cricket talents such as fellow Trinidadian Dwayne Bravo and franchise player Ross Taylor.

Nicholas Pooran

Nicholas Pooran

“Any 17-year-old who has been given an opportunity such as this would grasp it with both hands and that’s what I plan to do,” says the ambitious young wicketkeeper batsman.
Truth be told, Pooran is always ready to make Trinidad and Tobago proud, whether it is playing against other West Indian players like Chris Gayle or his fellow countryman Kieron Pollard. The Limacol CPL is Pooran’s opportunity to make his mark on the cricket arena under the watchful eyes of people around the region and the world.
Although he is the youngest player in the tournament, Pooran is no stranger to regional competition. He has represented his country in the Regional Under-15, Under-17 and Under-19 competitions and was also a member of the Trinidad and Tobago school boys’ Under-18 squad which won the International School Cricket Premier League Twenty20 competition.
He also emerged from the 2012 Under-19 competition in Barbados as the leading glove man, snaring 14 dismissals in five matches during the three-day format.
More importantly, Pooran announced his arrival on the senior stage earlier this year with a handsome unbeaten 33 on Regional Super50 debut for Trinidad and Tobago in a 14- run victory over Windward Islands, and while he had only meagre returns in his remaining three games, his promise remained evident.
Commenting on this remarkable young man, David Williams, assistant coach for the Trinidad and Tobago Red Steel team noted, “… he is a tremendous player. He is also a very young man, so I think we would want to watch him closely, and make sure he does the right things. With that talent, (I am sure) he has places to go.”
This Naparima College student, who plays for Clarke Road United in the domestic Premier League, understands the expectations that he has to live up to and does not plan to disappoint.
“I want to prove to people that the selectors have made a right decision in picking me.” Pooran’s first opportunity to play will come on July 31 when the Red Steel face the Guyana Amazon Warriors at Providence Stadium.
The inaugural Limacol Caribbean Premiere League begins on July 30 with 24 matches to be played across six Caribbean countries: Antigua, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, St Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago.
The Queen’s Park Oval will host seven matches, including the two semi-final and final matches. (CPL)

Limacol CPL tickets for Guyana matches on sale

Fans interested in attending matches at the Guyana National Stadium during the inaugural Limacol Caribbean Premier League (CPL) will not have to worry too much about any exorbitant costs of tickets. Ticket prices were released on Friday and will be sold at rock-bottom prices.

These cheerful cricket fans display their LCPL tickets after purchesing them at the local ticketing office on Friday afternoon

These cheerful cricket fans display their LCPL tickets after purchesing them at the local ticketing office on Friday afternoon

Tickets prices for Guyana’s Amazon Warriors first two games on July 31 and August 2 against Trinidad and Tobago’s Red Steel and Jamaica’s Tallawahs are: South West Stand (Green Stand) – Gy$ 2500 ( US$ 12.50); North West Stand ( Red Stand) – Gy$ 2000 ( US$ 10); South Stand (Orange Stand) – Gy$ 2000 ( US$ 10) and Grass Mound/ Party Stand Gy$ 1500 ( US$ 7.50). Both games start at 20: 00hrs.
Meanwhile, ticket prices for the double header on August 4 are: South West Stand (Green Stand) – Gy$ 3500 ( US$ 17.50); North West Stand ( Red Stand) – Gy$ 3000 ( US$ 15); South Stand (Orange Stand) -Gy$ 3000 ( US$ 15) and Grass Mound/ Party Stand – Gy$ 2000 ( US$ 10).
Antigua Hawksbills will play Jamaica Tallawahs from 15: 00h while Guyana Amazon Warriors will clash with St. Lucia Zouks in the feature game from 20: 00hrs.
Tickets are available at LCPL ticket office, former Del Casa building, Middle Street, Georgetown from Monday to Saturday from 09: 00h to 18: 00h and on Sunday from 10: 00h to 14: 00h leading up to the event.
Tickets are also available at Courts on Main Street and Diamond Public Road locations and Digicel, Avenue of the Republic, Georgetown, New Amsterdam, Rose Hall, Corriverton, Parika and Anna Regina locations and will be available during normal working hours.

The folly of omitting Shivnarine Chanderpaul

“Chanderpaul in one-day cricket? He’s too old, man! Brethren, he doesn’t score fast enough, he needs 150 overs! He’s been in so many losses man! Brotha, we’ve got to move on from him!” In the above few lines lies a modern-day cricket mystery that I struggle to comprehend.
The West Indies’ one-day international cricket team of 2013 is the personification of the phrase ‘all flash and little substance’. Blessed with a galaxy of stars of the Twenty20 arena, it’s a group that would command an IPL owner’s highest bids with ease and, given 20 overs of operation, would most likely deliver breathtaking results.
Sadly for them, T20s and ODIs are entirely different endeavours.
On the spectrum of cricket formats, ODIs are thought to be in the middle while T20s and Tests lie at their respective extremes. A closer consideration, though, gives a better idea of things as ODI cricket is closer to Test cricket in nature than T20.
Batsmen are required to build innings in ODIs, hence the format necessitates patience, soundness of technique, deep consideration, concentration, and conditional awareness.
In T20s, a ‘wham-bamthank- you-ma’am’ 50 in no time at all is a gamechanger, but in ODIs, its effect is not quite as prolific – a steady and calculated approach bears greater fruit in a 50-over war of attrition, as the value of an innings lies not just in the shots and runs, but also in the negotiation of bowlers, spells, fielding restrictions and playing conditions.
In the West Indies’ set-up, the vast majority of batsmen either completely lack or inexplicably suppress the rare talent of building an innings.
It is a talent that Shivnarine Chanderpaul, an evergreen batsman of close to 300 ODIs who has been producing runs across formats despite approaching the age of 40, has bursting forth from his antiglare eye patches. It is a gift that the powers that be in West Indies team selection are willfully blind to and, as collapses continue to litter modern- day West Indies cricket history, it is a boon that has been simply deserted.
Recent history bears testament to the need for a Chanderpaul-like presence.
Throughout the course of the Champions Trophy, when Chris Gayle or Marlon Samuels failed to provide a platform for an innings, the team’s batting would generally be lost at sea. In the just concluded tri-series with India and Sri Lanka, fireworks in Jamaica only temporarily hid the batting unit’s frailties, as the team eventually failed to make their own home series final.
Fast forward to Sunday, when Pakistan surgically dismantled the West Indies batting approach on a mine field in Providence, Guyana, and you could see the tumour just grow.
After pinpointing the ineptitude of the West Indies batsmen against pressure, and recognising the gaping need for an anchor man, Pakistan simply did what their team has the ability to do – they bowled a consistent and threatening line and length to allow the mentally fragile batsmen to whither in the South American heat. If only there were a stabiliser, a thorn in opposition’s side, a Trott-like gnat to hover annoyingly despite the predator’s fiercest swipes.
If only substance had not been jettisoned for style and if only conditional awareness had come into play when the squad was being picked to select a player, any player, who could dig deep and tackle the demons of the pitch and the opposition. Chanderpaul is renowned for prizing his wicket like no other – more often than not, he would have found a way to tough things out.
Those who support Chanderpaul completely understand the argument against his inclusion. Quite frankly, though, it doesn’t hold when compared with the need that exists. Across the cricketing world, ODI nations have their best Test batsmen in their line-ups because they recognise that the format requires a chutzpah that great Test batsmen possess.
From Amla to Trott to Misbah, there is the knowledge that you need a backbone in an ODI batting lineup, regardless of the lack of glamour. Unless another batsman in the current lineup steps up to do the dirty work, the selectors have to plug the enormous hole in their order.
Chanderpaul never retired from ODI cricket – he was a victim of a post-World Cup 2011 purge that placed the blame at his feet for the team’s unsuccessful campaign. He was a scapegoat, and he was thrown away in ODIs for the wrong reasons.
Chanderpaul is often described as a ‘crab’ at the crease. Crabs don’t make great entertainers. They don’t drive with elegance or pull with panache. They claw. They scratch. They exist in perpetual commotion with themselves, lacking suave but forever battling against all challenges. For the West Indies, there needs to be a survivor among the showmen; not only to see out the difficulties, but to help them develop strong shells of their own. (Cricinfo)

Guyanese Cyclist Naomi Singh A cycling prodigy

Guyanese female cyclist, Naomi Singh, began riding at an early age. Now 21, she has already made her mark on the local and regional cycling scene. From falling down during races to road accidents, the disciplined and persistent rider has faced many challenges, but has always kept her eyes set on the finish line.
Naomi, an East Coast native, was born Feb 12, 1992. In 2007, at the age of fifteen, she received the Guyana Cycling Federation (GCF) ‘Most Outstanding Female Rider’ award.   It was through the Teach Them Young cycle programme, organised by national cycling coach Hassan Mohamed, that Naomi received training and her first cycle.

Cyclist Naomi Singh

Cyclist Naomi Singh

At the 2008 National Schools’ Cycling Championships, Naomi won the coveted gold medal in the girls’ open 25km cycle road race. At the 2009 George Cumberbatch Memorial race meet, held at the National Park, she won the female clash ahead of Abigail Humphrey, daughter of former national star, the late Troy Humphrey.
Later that year, in June, she participated in the annual P&P Insurance Brokers Cycling Programme where there was no female category due to the lack of participants, but the lone female rider,  then 16 years old, rode in the Boys 12-14 Years 3-lap race and finished in second place. A few months later, in October 2009, she participated in the Inter Guiana Games (IGG) in Suriname where she placed third and took home the bronze medal.
Over the years, Naomi enjoyed many more triumphs. In March 2010 at the Cheddi Jagan Memorial Road Race, she rode her way to victory in the ladies’ category.  Other wins include first place at the 2010 Annual Universal Auto and General Supplies’ Cycling Programme and the 50th National Schools Cycling, Swimming and Track and Field Championships.
In October 2011 at the Leslie King Memorial Cycle Classic in Trinidad, she secured second position.  She then won first place at the 2011 IGG road race held in Guyana. Naomi was also the only female among four cyclists who represented Guyana at the 2011 International Easter Fest cycling championship in Trinidad.
Naomi was one of three cyclists to be awarded a special prize at the Caribbean Cycling Championships in October 2012 in Antigua for their courage in participating in the gruelling ‘Ride for Life’ 266-mile event five-stage cycling meet. That same year Naomi was the first female to cross the finish line at the Roraima Bikers Club (RBC)/Digicel/Avon Breast Cancer Awareness 25-lap cycle road race.

Singh (first left) during a race with top cyclists in Suriname (Photo by Rawle Toney)

Singh (first left) during a race with top cyclists in Suriname (Photo by Rawle Toney)

Naomi describes cycling as her passion, but also admitted that she has made some bad choices, one of which was dropping out of school in Fourth Form. Consumed by the sport of cycling, Naomi invested her time and resources in following her passion. However, she has plans to enrol with an education institution.
The cyclist reveals that a challenge for her is the lack of female competitors, and so she has to measure her performance against male counterparts. Determined not to be deterred by this, Naomi continues to perfect her skills.
Her family, she notes, is her support base financially, and this has allowed her to pursue cycling. Naomi’s goal before she quits cycling is to become the Caribbean female cycling champion. (Information from www. guyanesegirlsrock.com)

Chanderpaul, Fernandes receive Guyana’s top sports awards

Shivnarine Chanderpaul received yet another Sportsman-of-the-Year award in Guyana on Sunday evening when the National Sports Commission (NSC) held its annual awards ceremony at the Guyana International Convention Centre, Liliendaal. Collecting the award on behalf of Chanderpaul was Guyana Times /TVG 28 news anchor and sports journalist Avenash Ramzan, who won the Sports Reporter-of-the year (non print) award earlier in the evening.
However, prior to the presentation of the awards, Director of Sport Neil Kumar gave an extensive report for 2012, indication also that last Thursday a new NSC council was elected.

Dr Frank Anthony (second right); Director of Sport Neil Kumar (left); Permanent Secretary within the Sport Ministry, Alfred King (second left) pose with awardees and other officials after the award ceremony (Photo: Carl Croker)

Dr Frank Anthony (second right); Director of Sport Neil Kumar (left); Permanent Secretary within the Sport Ministry, Alfred King (second left) pose with awardees and other officials after the award ceremony (Photo: Carl Croker)

Kumar revealed the successes and development of all of the sports, pointing out specific achievements of the various sporting fraternities and describing the performances as “excellent”. The long-serving sport director also mentioned the continued maintenance of facilities, the ones under construction and the numerous days of interaction the Sport Ministry and the NSC conducted.
Permanent Secretary within the ministry, Alfred King pointed out that for sport to move forward, greater cohesion needs to exist among key stakeholders, indicating that government is cognisant of the role of sport in today’s society.
Sport Minister Dr Frank Anthony, during his feature address, delved into the importance of exercise in one’s daily routine while expanding on the main diseases that can result from an inactive lifestyle.
On the other hand, Anthony urged that for sportsmen and women to do well, the private sector needs to invest in sporting facilities while pointing out the need for the associations to produce their sports database.
“We plug about GY$200 million into the development of community ground and we want the people to utilise these grounds but we would like to see the private sector invest in more facilities, in the U. S., the private sector invest heavily in sport facilities and are making money because they have sport entrepreneurs, and this is something we must change and we hope to convince the private sector to contribute to sport.
“Many of the sports organisations have consistently failed to submit their information to the NSC and I would like for the NSC to publish those association on a yearly basis… we need to have the database of our athletes for each association and if an association is unable to name each athlete in its sport, then how can we move forward, we must also have the database on all the coaches, it is important,” Anthony stressed.
In addition, Anthony pointed out all the facilities being built and were built to help sport improve.
He also maintained that the Resource Centre is expected to be completed by the end of this year.
“It is important we understand the science of the sport and the resource centre will provide information, every month we plan to have one lecture on physiology, anatomy, so our people can understand the science of the sport. It is something we want to evolve into a sports institute.
“Jamaica has about 350 people in their school system and if we want to achieve, we have to start putting people in the school systems and every other system. At the stadium in the parking lot we also want to add the portable types of equipment to play basketball, but we need partners to do these things and it is hard sometimes to wait on partners,” Anthony noted.
He congratulated the awardees on their achievement and concluded by stating that things can only get better.

Guyana Times/TVG 28 news anchor and sports journalist Avenash Ramzan (left) receives his award from Deputy Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Sport, Steve Ninvalle

Guyana Times/TVG 28 news anchor and sports journalist Avenash Ramzan (left) receives his award from Deputy Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Sport, Steve Ninvalle

“There are many optimistic things that are happening and you can see that on the horizon that they will only get brighter.”
Awardees:- Sportsman-of-the-Year: Shivnarine Chanderpaul (cricket); Sportswoman-of-the-Year Nicolette Fernandes (squash); runner-up Sportsman-of-the-Year Winston Stoby (power lifting); runner-up Sportswoman -of-the-Year Dawn Barker (power lifting); Junior Sportsman-of-the-Year Paul DeNobrega (cycling); Junior Sportswoman-of-the-Year Chelsea Edghill (table tennis); runner-up Sportsman-of-the-Year Gumendra Shewdas (power lifting); runner-up Sportswoman-of-the-Year Pryana Rhamdhani (badminton) and Mary Fung-AFat (squash); Best Sports-Team-of-the-Year Junior squash national team; Coach-of-the-Year Carl Ince (squash); Most-Improved-Sports Association, Power Lifting Federation; Sports Photographer-of-the-Year Orlando Charles (Stabroek Sport); Sports-Reporter-of-the-Year (non print): Avenash Ramzan (TVG28/Guyana Times ); Sports Reporter of the Year (print): Calvin Roberts (Chronicle Sport); Sports Officials of the Year Peter Abdool and Stephanie Frazer.
Meanwhile, representatives from all the regions across Guyana received awards for their contribution to sports during the year 2012.

Mahadeo wins Central Corentyne Flexout

Leon Mahadeo of House Pain Gym in Belvedere is now the holder of the Mr Central Corentyne Flexout 2013 title after he flexed and posed his way to victory over his two opponents on Saturday evening.
Coming in as the lightest bodybuilder in the field, Mahadeo nevertheless showed superior muscular definition and balance to earn the nod of the judges in both the light and overall categories. In the Light category, Deresh Narainsammy and Tejpaul Gwendsammy placed second and third respectively to Mahadeo.

Leon Mahadeo poses with family members and his trophy

Leon Mahadeo poses with family members and his trophy

In the Middle category, Leon Mark Benjamin of Albion Community Centre Gym showed especially impressive upper body development to out-muscle Raymond Rabindranauth of House of Pain Gym into second place and Khemraj Gopilall of Power House Gym into third place.
The Heavy category saw Chetram Jankeram of Power House Gym massing it over his fellow gym-mate Danpaul Jaggernauth to win first place, with Kumar (only name) of House of Pain Gym in third spot.
A huge crowd was in attendance to watch the event, which marked the official launch of the House of Pain Gym at Ankerville, Port Mourant, owned and managed by Raheem Ali.
The welcome was given by Mustapha Ali, the father of Raheem Ali and owner of Ali’s Halaal at Tain, while Mr. Poonai of Poonai’s Pharmacy at Rose Hall delivered the official opening remarks. The MC and Chief Judge for the evening was Donald Sinclair, Managing Director of Flex Night Incorporated.
Poonai’s Pharmacy of Rose Hall was on hand to offer samples of bodybuilding supplements.
Devon Davis, Mr Guyana 2012, and Nadina Taharally, Miss Flex Night Best Legs 2012, were the featured guest posers.
Shawnell Warner (Miss Flex Night Bikini), Nadina Taharally (Miss Flex Night Best Legs), Stacy Small (Miss Flex Night Best Legs runner-up) and Sylvon Gardner (four-time CAC gold medallist) did the honours of presenting trophies.
Sponsors of the event included Banks DIH Limited, Paul Singh of Port Mourant, Sase Naraine of Hampshire, Sunshine Grocery of Chesney, Mattie Cell Phone Shop of Rose Hall, R& S Shopping Complex, Assif Hamid of Hampshire, Poonai’s Pharmacy of Rose Hall, Zearat Ally Poultry Supply of Nigg, Imran Khan (Emo) of Belvedere, Benjamin Sports of Fyrish/ Gibraltar, Ali’s Halaal of Tain, D. Arjune Poultry Supply of Albion, Hamid of Fyrish and Haroon Mookshawh of Canada.
The judging panel comprised David Gomes, Onai Vasconcellos and Diane Sinclair, with Robyn Marshall- Lord as Statistician and Stacey Gomes as Backstage Manager.

Guyanese Damodar Daesrath in Canada’s team for ICC championship

By Ravendra Madholall –

Guyanese all-rounder Damodar Daesrath has been named in Canada’s team for the upcoming annual International Cricket Council (ICC) Cricket League Championships which got underway on Monday in Dubai.
Coach of the team, former West Indies and Trinidad and Tobago cricketer Gus Logie has expressed great confidence the guys will make a good showing in the competition, which is being used primarily for their 2015 ICC World Cup 50-over qualification.

Damodar Daesrath

Damodar Daesrath

Daesrath, a former Guyana senior captain, is the lone player from the Caribbean included this time in the North American side and he revealed he should make a big contribution towards the team’s ambition at the World Cup level.
The 31-year-old right-handed batsman and off-spinner plays for Brampton Masters Cricket Club in Toronto, after settling down in Canada a decade ago. Daesrath was born in Berbice and represented Guyana at the youth level too.
“I [am] confident I will do well for my team on this trip; I think we have a balanced side and that has given me the confidence we need to can compete with the rest of the associated teams to get qualified for the mega ICC world Cup in 2015,”Daesrath related.
Canada will begin their campaign against Kenya in two 50-over games before taking on the same opponent in two T20 contests and then a solitary four-day clash. All the matches will be played at the ICC Global Cricket Academy.
“We have known our level of the game, having participated in a number of domestic competitions leading up to this assignment; the guys have shown a lot of eagerness and they worked hard too.I think with Gus (Logie) around and with his wealth of experiencwe should able to show the world that we are capable of getting into the world cup tournament,” Daesrath, who featured in 16 four-day and eight one-day matches for Guyana, divulged.
Meanwhile, Logie, who has been in and out of the side in this capacity since 2003, was also full of confidence that the guys are ready to make a name abroad.

Gus Logie

Gus Logie

“We have been preparing hard for the competition; we had a few practice matches in Trinidad and I think that really helped us immensely to get ourselves ready for this important tournament. We have a good bunch of players who can create a tremendous impact and take the team to biggest competition,” the 52-year-old Logie reckoned.
Logie also feels Canada could produce quality players, but once these talented cricketers put in the extra effort, they can put the North American country a far way.
“There is always talent in Canada’s cricket; the weather may be a daunting factor but once these guys get to play cricket on a regular basis, I think they will do well at all levels. We have had several overseas trips and they showed the kind of enthusiasm and determination to succeed, so I guess things can get better for the betterment of the game soon,” Logie, who played 52 tests, reasoned.
Daesrath’s compatriot Jeremy Gordon was also named in the team initially, but pulled out just before the departure ,owing to personal reasons. The former Guyana fast bowler Gordon, represented Canada also last year in Scotland.
Like Daesrath, Gordon plays for Brampton Masters.

The Junior Carifta Trials: Five factors to ponder on

By Treiston Joseph –

The junior Carifta trials held on March 2 and 3 at the Guyana Defence Force ground, Camp Ayanganna, had some brilliant performances that are currently still being registered in the minds of track and field enthusiasts.
There was the case of young Cassey George from Linden that quickly made a name for herself by qualifying for the junior Carifta Games in the Under-17 category.

Cassey George

Cassey George

It was the first track meet of the year that the Athletics Association of Guyana (AAG) held where athletes got to perform on the track and it was overall above the regular standard for the first meet of the year.
However, with that in mind five things to look at coming from the 2013 junior Carifta trials follow in the upcoming points.
Cassey George’s emergence
She is 14 years old and clocked 4:44.1s in the Under-17 1500m. She has automatically become a gold medal contender at the junior Carifta games in The Bahamas from April and anything less may be a disappointment.
Why such a proclamation? Two-time Under-17 1500m Carifta gold medallist in 2009 and 2010 Jevina Straker did not run the 1500 metres at the 2009 Carifta trials, instead she ran the 400m and the 800m, of which she qualified for the 800m in the 2009. She was entered for both the 800 and 1500m and captured gold in the latter with a time of 4:42.89s, a commendable feat.
Fast forward to 2010 Straker clocked 5:15.2s in the 1500 metres at the Carifta trials held at the Police ground but clocked 4:43.33s at the Carifta Games to take gold.
In 2012 Under-17 1500m bronze medalist Andrea Foster clocked 5:08s to make the Carifta team and clocked 4:57.28s to get the bronze medal.
The pattern seems clear! They excel at the Carifta Games and should George pull off a performance anywhere close to what she had, or better, her chances of landing Guyana a third gold medal at the Carifta Games in five years are very high.
Guyana has found yet another 1500m gem and once her talents are harnessed properly, she can become very dominant at her trade as she gets older.

Jason Yaw wins Under-17 200m in 21.7s

Jason Yaw wins Under-17 200m in 21.7s

Rare sprint occurrence
On the final day (day two) of the Carifta trials, Under-17 sprinters Tirana Mitchell and Jason Yaw pulled off a rare occurrence as both clocked 200m times either faster than or equal to their under-20 counterparts.
Mitchell ran 24.5s in the Under-17 200m which qualified her for the Carifta Games. But what was a more telling stat is her under-20 counterpart Tiffany Carto ran the exact time as Mitchell (24.5s).
Yaw, on the other hand, clocked 21.7s in the under-17 200m and qualified for the Carifta Games as well with a time that would have blown away the Under-20 field; the winner Kevin Abbensetts clocked 22.1s to win the Under-20 version.
Such an occurrence holds both promise and fear for the future of sprinting in Guyana since on the one hand you have two relatively young and improving talents, while the other notion outlines the lingering fears that the pool of quality sprinters in Guyana are dwindling.
100m and 200m times should not be taken as gospel
Given the fact that the 100m on the Guyana Defence Force ground, Camp Ayanganna runs north to south and the heavy winds from the closely situated Atlantic Ocean more than likely all 100m times would have been wind aided, hence faster times than usual.

Alita Moore clocks 11.8s in Under-20 women’s 100m

Alita Moore clocks 11.8s in Under-20 women’s 100m

It was at the same ground that Rupert Perry clocked an unbelievably staggering 9.90s seconds last year.
In the 200m races, which start at the north-eastern end of the ground and end where the 100m end, athletes would have some amount of wind assistance as well, once athletes turn for the homestretch.
While this fact is not meant to discredit the efforts of the athletes that participated at the junior Carifta trials, it is a fact that must be pointed out in order for selectors to make better decisions.
Time-keeping seemed accurate
Despite the heavy wind assistance, any time the athletes might have received, seemed fairly accurate as all the athletes were capable of the times they performed on a ground with less wind. Most had been within the range that they recorded at GDF ground.
In essence, kudos to the Athletics Association of Guyana for being more efficient in this regard. Their officials have had their fair share of problems recording some unbelievable times especially in the sprint events. Hopefully, they will continue to get it right this year.
Room for improvement in male middle and long distance running
The middle and long distance events in the male categories (especially the juniors) were below par. Whether it is due to a short offseason or the lack of interest, middle and long distance running in the junior ranks was boring with no male athlete displaying any sort of aggression.
Samuel Kaiton ran the best long distance race of the meet in the male 5000m event where he clocked 17:38.6s.
The shorter versions were even more horrid as none of the athletes especially the under-20 athletes failed to break the two-minute barrier, which under-17 males outside of Guyana comfortably go under.
It is an issue that needs to be addressed by the coaches as these events are not even looked upon by track and field enthusiast with the amount of seriousness as is the case with the sprint events.
Conclusion
The meet was a good first outing for the athletes and hopefully by mid-season better times will be recorded. The AAG also needs to have more meets which would then up the productivity of the athletes.
However, if it is one thing about the 2013 Carifta junior trials, it’s the fact that Guyana has the junior talents to go places.

Chris Gayle gives back to Lucas Cricket Club

West Indies star batsman Chris Gayle, who late last year launched a nursery programme at his Lucas Cricket Club, which is named in his honour, was returning to the east Kingston outfit to make a Ja$543,000 donation, which is expected to drive the programme that caters to youngsters from the community.
The former West Indies captain, who has had much documented issues with the WICB, raised several eye brows when he requested a break from the current series, but as he explained, the move is merely temporary and is meant to recharge his batteries ahead of a long cricketing season.
“I felt that I had been playing a lot of cricket and I was getting mentally drained and that is not good, your cricket will fall apart if you’re mentally drained, and I felt the need to take a break,” said Gayle. “I asked them (WICB) for the break and, thankfully, it was granted.
“It’s not a long break, I will be back for the Test series, I’m still in preparation, putting in the work to be mentally and physically ready for the first Test match coming up,” he added.
Gayle, who is hoping that his foundation will play a role in improving the state of the club where he rose to prominence, labelled the contribution as the start of greater things to come.
“It’s good to be back to be able to make another formal presentation. This is the start of a new beginning for Lucas and the Chris Gayle Foundation and, hopefully, a lot of hands can come together to help this foundation grow from strength to strength,” said Gayle.
Foundation director and Gayle’s manager, Radcliffe Haynes, was excited about the prospects and possible impact of the project.
“ We hope that this will go a far way in helping Lucas Cricket Club, the home of George Headley, Chris Gayle, Gareth Breese and a number of other persons, in realising the dream of taking back Lucas on top of cricket in Jamaica and helping the youngsters as well,” said Haynes.
Also on hand where executives from Gayle’s bat sponsor Spartan Sports, who announced a scholarship element, which will see one youngster, chosen by Gayle, receiving full cricket supplies to aid in his development. (windiescricket)

DeNobrega is Guyana’s junior sportsman of the year

By Avenash Ramzan –

Teenaged cyclist Paul DeNobrega said he was surprised to be adjudged junior Sportsman-of- the-Year for last year when a National Sports Commission (NSC) panel of judges met at the Cliff Anderson Sports Hall.
The ‘Team Coco’ rider, who celebrated his 19th birthday on Wednesday, won from a pool of four nominees, gaining seven of 11 votes. Powerlifter Gumendra Shewdas, karaketa Alexander Cheeks and squash/ football player Nyron Joseph were the other contenders for the award.

Paul DeNobrega receives a jersey from Team Coco’s owner, Ian “QB” Davis, after copping the junior title of the “Ride for Life” Five-Stage cycling event last year

Paul DeNobrega receives a jersey from Team Coco’s owner, Ian “QB” Davis, after copping the junior title of the “Ride for Life” Five-Stage cycling event last year

“I was kind of surprised that I won the award,” he told Guyana Times International during an interview on Wednesday.
“I know I did very well last year, but I didn’t expect to be recognised in this way.” Nevertheless, the former Continental Cycle Club member is heartened to be honoured at the national level, noting that his achievement is perhaps just reward for the hours of training he put his body through and the hundreds of miles he rode in the past year.
“Yes, I’m happy that the judges recognised my performance and chose me, and I want to thank all those who helped and encouraged me along the way. My coach Wayne Henry from Canada, “Uncle Joe” [veteran rider Joseph Fariah], “Mr QB” [Ian Davis] from Team Coco and my family,” DeNobrega, the Caribbean road race champion, said.
While he noted that all those persons have played significant roles in his development since he turned a cyclist at the age of 15, DeNobrega reserved special mention for Henry, who he said has been an influential figure over the years.
“Uncle Wayne has been coaching me all through those four years and in that time I won races in Guyana, Antigua, Suriname and Anguilla, with my most notable performance coming at the Caribbean Junior Championship in Dominica in 2012. Even though he lives in Canada, we communicate frequently as to my progress, and without his help and guidance I don’t think that performance would be at this level,” the rider explained.
Achievements
At last year’s “ Ride for Life” Five- Stage meet, DeNobrega, along with local riders Raynauth Jeffrey, Raul Leal, Michael Anthony, Walter Grant- Stuart and Junior Niles, was drafted in the Florida- based Team Coco after the owner, ‘QB’ Davis, spotted a tremendous degree of talent in the six Guyanese cyclists.
DeNobrega did not disappoint, copping the junior title in a time of nine hours, 57 minutes, 01 second (09h: 57m: 01s), and finishing second to Team Coco’s Jaime Ramirez, who clocked a record- breaking nine hours, 46 minutes, 51 seconds (09h: 46m: 51s) to eclipse the previous record of 10 hours, 29 minutes, 39 seconds (10h: 29m: 39s).
The young rider won the final stage of that race from Linden to Georgetown, finishing the 62- mile event in two hours, 35 minutes, 58 seconds (02h: 35m: 58s).
Apart from his success in the prestigious Five-Stage race and being crowned Caribbean junior champion, the first time Junior Sportsman-of- the-Year, won both the Anguilla and Antigua junior races, while he copped the runner- up spot in the NSC Independence Three- Stage and spearheaded the Guyana team to victory in the Time Trials and road race at the Inter- Guiana Games.
That apart, he was constantly in winners’ row at local races held at the inner circuit of the National Park and the roadways.
The Guyana Cycling Federation (GCF), the body which nominated him for the award, said of the cyclist: “However, other than his fabulous riding in 2012, DeNobrega exhibited great sportsmanship and leadership ability. Due to these qualities, Paul DeNobrega was elevated to the position of captain of the National Junior Cycling team.”
Disciplined youngster
National cycling coach, Hassan Mohamed, who has seen first- hand, DeNobrega’s growth, said the young man is shining example of what can be achieved through discipline and hard work.
“He started in the ‘Teach Them Young’ programme years ago and from what I’ve observed, he is a very disciplined guy, and I think once he focuses on what he wants to achieve and don’t become complacent, he has a far way to go,” Mohamed said.
The long-serving administrator added, “In a short space of time, he has made a solid contribution as a representative of Guyana, and I’m very proud of him that he won the award. I think he has bigger things to come and once he continues in the same vein, he will be a force to reckon with.” President of the GCF, Cheryl Thompson, echoed similar sentiments, adding that DeNobrega is a worthy winner of the national award.
“I’m very happy that he got the judges’ nod, because he is one of the most disciplined and dedicated guys around. He deserves the award, and I would want to wish him well as he seeks to work his way up and become the best in Guyana,” Thompson said in an invited comment.
DeNobrega will receive his award on March 22 when a ceremony is hosted by the NSC at the National Cultural Centre.